Immediate Care

Rapid Medical Care for Non-emergency Situations

Need quick access to a doctor, but don’t feel you need emergency care? Loyola Medicine’s Immediate Care Centers offer prompt medical attention for adults and children on a walk-in basis at three convenient locations—no appointment necessary.

You may wish to visit one of Loyola’s immediate care centers for a health concern that is not life-threatening, a visit to immediate care may be a more convenient choice; a visit to the emergency room can take longer and be more expensive than a visit to immediate care.  

At Loyola’s immediate care centers, you can see a board-certified doctor to treat your acute condition as soon as possible. Care is provided year-round, and the cost is similar to that of an appointment with your primary care physician.

Seeking instant medical attention for non-life-threatening medical issues is easy and convenient at our Immediate Care centers:

Each immediate care center has extended hours of operation for your convenience:

  • Monday through Friday, 8 am to 8 pm
  • Weekends and holidays, 8 am to 3 pm (Closed Christmas Day)

Why Choose Loyola for Immediate Care?

Because Loyola is an academic medical center, our doctors are pursuing clinical research on many different conditions and diseases and engaging in continuing education on the latest treatments and technology. Our patients benefit from receiving care that is at the forefront of modern medicine. All patients are seen by board-certified physicians, with subsequent integration of any needed specialty or primary care services within an integrated health system.

What Services are Available for Immediate Care?

Loyola’s Immediate Care centers offer advanced medical services to ensure your health and safety whenever you need urgent health attention. We offer comprehensive care for patients with non-life-threatening medical conditions, including:

  • Allergies
  • Animal/insect bites
  • Broken bones
  • Cold and flu symptoms
  • Congestion
  • Cough
  • Diarrhea
  • Earaches/infection
  • Fever
  • Foreign objects in eye, ear or nose
  • Fractures
  • Infections
  • Minor asthma attacks
  • Minor bruises/sprains
  • Minor burns (including sunburns)
  • Minor lacerations
  • Mono (mononucleosis) 
  • Pink eye
  • Rash/skin irritation
  • Respiratory infection
  • Sexually transmitted diseases
  • Sinus infection/sinus problems
  • Sore throat 
  • Urinary tract infections​

We also provide the following diagnostic tests at our Immediate Care Centers:

  • Blood sugar test
  • Electrocardiogram (EKG)
  • Flu shots and tetanus boosters
  • Pregnancy test
  • Strep test
  • Urine tests
  • X-ray

How is Immediate Care Different Than Emergency Care?

Immediate care is not the same as emergency room care. Loyola’s Immediate Care Centers provide care for health conditions requiring prompt medical attention, but which are not life-threatening. The cost of an immediate care visit is similar to the cost of a doctor visit, and wait times to see Loyola’s immediate care doctors are much shorter than emergency room wait times. Loyola’s immediate care doctors will follow up with you and your doctor after treatment. 

If you or a loved one is experiencing a life-threatening medical issue, seek emergency care immediately. If you are experiencing any of the symptoms below, call 911 or go directly to a hospital emergency department:

  • Any type of severe pain
  • Chest pain 
  • Choking
  • Coughing up or throwing up blood
  • Cuts with major bleeding that doesn’t stop
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Foreign object ingestion
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Multiple rib fractures
  • New swelling in an arm or leg with warmth and/or redness
  • Possible poisoning or overdose
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Seizure
  • Serious fractures
  • Serious injury
  • Serious laceration
  • Severe allergic reaction
  • Sudden and severe headache
  • Sudden blurred vision
  • Sudden confusion or trouble speaking
  • Sudden dizziness
  • Sudden shortness of breath
  • Sudden trouble seeing
  • Sudden trouble walking, loss of balance or coordination
  • Sudden weakness or numbness in the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body

Loyola’s emergency medicine doctors are specially trained to care for patients experiencing serious medical conditions including trauma, broken bones, blood clots, heart attack and stroke.