Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Vitamin D Deficiency Shown to Increase Rejection Rates in Lung Transplant Patients

MAYWOOD, Ill. -- Vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increase in lung transplant rejection and infections, according to research conducted at Loyola University Health System (LUHS). Researchers also found that recipients who remained deficient for one year following the transplant had a higher mortality rate than those who had normal vitamin D levels. These data were published in the latest issue of The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation.

“Patients who undergo lung transplants are at risk for rejecting the organ, and two-thirds of these patients are vitamin D deficient,” said Erin Lowery, MD, first author, assistant professor, Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine (SSOM). “Given the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in lung transplant patients and the growing evidence that this supplement helps the immune system tolerate the organ, optimal levels of vitamin D are critical for positive outcomes in these patients."

The study evaluated 102 patients who underwent a lung transplant and had vitamin D levels evaluated within 100 days prior to or following surgery. Twenty-one patients had normal vitamin D levels and 81 were deficient. The rejection rate in the deficient group was more than double that of the nondeficient group. Infections also were more frequent in the deficient group than in the nondeficient group (mean 4.01 versus 2.71). In addition, the mortality rate of vitamin D deficient patients one year after transplant was nearly five times higher than those who were not deficient.

Prior to lung transplant, 52 percent of patients received a vitamin D supplement. An additional evaluation was performed one year after transplant to determine if levels were normal or deficient. Seventy-five patients had normal vitamin D levels and 27 were deficient. In the year after the lung transplant, all patients received a vitamin D supplement.

The health benefits of vitamin D are widespread and range from warding off cancer, osteoporosis, heart disease, diabetes and depression. Until now, researchers could only speculate that vitamin D also improves the health of lung transplant patients.

“This was the first study to explore the impact of vitamin D deficiency in lung transplant patients,” said Pauline Camacho, MD, director of the Loyola University Osteoporosis and Metabolic Bone Disease Center, Loyola University Health System (LUHS). “We have determined that there are multiple benefits to maintaining normal vitamin D levels in lung transplant patients."

Other investigators were: Bradford Bemiss, MD, chief resident, Department of Medicine, SSOM; Thomas Cascino, fourth-year medical student, SSOM; Ramon Durazo-Arvizu, PhD, assistant professor, Department of Preventive Medicine & Epidemiology, SSOM; Sean M. Forsythe, MD, associate professor of medicine, Department of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine, SSOM; Charles Alex, MD, FCCP, program director for lung transplant, LUHS; Franco Laghi, MD, professor of medicine, Department of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine; and Robert B. Love, MD, lung transplant surgeon and professor, Departments of Thoracic & Cardiovascular Surgery and Microbiology & Immunology, SSOM.

About Loyola University Health System

Loyola University Health System (LUHS) is part of Trinity Health. Based in the western suburbs of Chicago, LUHS is a quaternary care system with a 61-acre main medical center campus, the 36-acre Gottlieb Memorial Hospital campus and more than 30 primary and specialty care facilities in Cook, Will and DuPage counties. Loyola University Medical Center’s campus is conveniently located in Maywood, 13 miles west of Chicago’s Loop and 8 miles east of Oak Brook, Ill. At the heart of the medical center campus is a 559-licensed-bed hospital that houses a Level 1 Trauma Center, a Burn Center and the Ronald McDonald® Children's Hospital of Loyola University Medical Center. Also on campus are the Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, Loyola Outpatient Center, Center for Heart & Vascular Medicine and Loyola Oral Health Center as well as Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing and the Loyola Center for Fitness. Loyola's Gottlieb campus in Melrose Park includes the 255-licensed-bed community hospital, the Professional Office Building housing 150 private practice clinics, the Adult Day Care, the Gottlieb Center for Fitness, Loyola Center for Metabolic Surgery and Bariatric Care and the Loyola Cancer Care & Research at the Marjorie G. Weinberg Cancer Center at Melrose Park.

Trinity Health is a national Catholic health system with an enduring legacy and a steadfast mission to be a transforming and healing presence within the communities we serve. Trinity is committed to being a people-centered health care system that enables better health, better care and lower costs. Trinity Health has 88 hospitals and hundreds of continuing care facilities, home care agencies and outpatient centers in 21 states and 119,000 employees.