Friday, March 18, 2011

Think Before You Drink: Calories Posted on New Beverage Labels Shock Consumers

MELROSE PARK, Ill. – Americans may like their drinks “sickeningly sweet,” but a new labeling initiative may discourage us from gulping unnecessary calories, said Jessica Bartfield, MD, medical weight-loss specialist at Gottlieb Memorial Hospital. As of February, the front labels of packaged beverages now include the total number of calories in containers of 20 ounces or less. The beverage industry began this initiative in support of First Lady Michelle Obama’s campaign to fight childhood obesity. “Liquid caloric consumption can be quite a significant contribution to weight gain, so this is a tremendous effort to educate the public,” said Dr. Bartfield, who is part of the Loyola University Health System’s physician-led team of exercise physiologists, nutritionists and psychologists who work together to change the behaviors of those who are significantly overweight.

“Beverage containers traditionally ‘hid’ the nutritional content at the back in a small square with small print and cleverly listed just the calorie content per serving,” Bartfield said. “Unbeknownst to those who are happily guzzling their favorite cola or fruit drink, most packaged beverages contain multiple servings, and most Americans fail to do the math on the total calorie count,” she said. Dr. Bartfield’s top 3 “sickeningly sweet” statistics include: 1 – Just A Spoonful of Sugar - “The average American consumes 22.5 teaspoons of added sugar daily, half of which comes from regular soda and fruit drinks, according to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey,” conducted from 1999 to 2004, she said. 2 – Sugar On Top – “About 10 percent of overweight adults consume 450 calories of sugar-sweetened beverages per day, which is three times that of an average American. Cutting 450 calories per day would lead to about a 1 pound per week weight loss, close to 50 pounds in one year.” 3 - Babies and Beverages – “A study from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that reduction in sugar-sweetened beverages (regular soda, fruit drinks and fruit punch) had a significant effect on weight change at 6 months and 18 months, even more of an impact than solid-calorie reduction.” Message in a Bottle Chicagoan Aaron Villarreal, 35, regularly drank about 12 cans of cola every day before joining the Gottlieb Medical Weight Loss Program when his weight topped out at 350 pounds. "I was stunned when the nutritionist poured white sugar in a measuring cup to show me how much sugar I was drinking in just one day," he said. Villarreal cut cola from his diet and lost 5 pounds in one week. "Seeing that one small change make such a dramatic difference encouraged me to improve my diet in other ways and to add exercise," Villareal said.

About Loyola University Health System

Loyola University Health System (LUHS) is part of Trinity Health. Based in the western suburbs of Chicago, LUHS is a quaternary care system with a 61-acre main medical center campus, the 36-acre Gottlieb Memorial Hospital campus and more than 30 primary and specialty care facilities in Cook, Will and DuPage counties. Loyola University Medical Center’s campus is conveniently located in Maywood, 13 miles west of Chicago’s Loop and 8 miles east of Oak Brook, Ill. At the heart of the medical center campus is a 559-licensed-bed hospital that houses a Level 1 Trauma Center, a Burn Center and the Ronald McDonald® Children's Hospital of Loyola University Medical Center. Also on campus are the Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, Loyola Outpatient Center, Center for Heart & Vascular Medicine and Loyola Oral Health Center as well as Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing and the Loyola Center for Fitness. Loyola's Gottlieb campus in Melrose Park includes the 255-licensed-bed community hospital, the Professional Office Building housing 150 private practice clinics, the Adult Day Care, the Gottlieb Center for Fitness, Loyola Center for Metabolic Surgery and Bariatric Care and the Loyola Cancer Care & Research at the Marjorie G. Weinberg Cancer Center at Melrose Park.

Trinity Health is a national Catholic health system with an enduring legacy and a steadfast mission to be a transforming and healing presence within the communities we serve. Trinity is committed to being a people-centered health care system that enables better health, better care and lower costs. Trinity Health has 88 hospitals and hundreds of continuing care facilities, home care agencies and outpatient centers in 21 states and 119,000 employees.