Thursday, March 24, 2011

Spring Break and Prom Prime Season for Dangerous Tanning

No Regulations Exist for Skin Examination in Children

MELROSE PARK, Ill. – During spring break and prom season, students often turn to tanning beds in search of that head-to-toe glow. "You wouldn't stand naked a few inches from the sun, yet that is essentially what you are doing in a tanning bed," said Julie Moore, MD, dermatologist, Gottlieb Memorial Hospital, part of the Loyola University Health System. "Tanning beds are just as dangerous as outdoor sunbathing when it comes to the potential for skin cancer." Surge in Skin Cancer for Youth Women ages 18 to 25 are the fastest-growing group for a new diagnosis of skin cancer, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. Why? At this age, women put more value in their appearance and feel they are invincible. "Wrinkles, age spots and leathery skin have not yet happened to them," Moore said. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), less than one-third of all youth take the proper steps to protect their skin from excessive exposure to the sun. Having just one blistering childhood sunburn more than doubles the chance of developing a melanoma - the deadliest form of skin cancer - later in life, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation. Moore points out there are more options than ever for those who seek a healthy glow. “Bare arms, shoulders and legs can be safely bronzed using self-tanning creams and lotions to achieve a healthy appearance without the unhealthy side effects.” Gone are the days when skin turned orange due to drugstore tanning lotions. "There are many excellent brands at the drugstore today that create a very realistic color," Moore said. "I use self-tanning lotion found over the counter year-round." "Soccer, baseball, tennis, swimming – kids of all ages participate in all kinds of outdoor activities. They need to use sun protection, even if they are just out skateboarding or talking with their friends in the yard." Save Your Hide - Doctor’s Top Tips for Skin Health Here are Dr. Moore's five favorite tips for protecting your skin from cancer: 1. "During your next hair, pedicure or massage appointment, ask if there are any unusual moles or skin lesions."Self-checking in certain areas is very difficult; don't hesitate to enlist the aid of those around you to monitor your skin’s health." 2. "Create a map of your skin and note any changes. Draw an outline of a body, front and back, and note on the diagram where you have moles or spots. Include comments such as the size, shape and color. After bathing, when you towel off and apply lotion is a good time to get in the habit of performing self-checks. Use a hand-held mirror to view between toes and the bottom of your feet and back." 3."Know your A, B, C, D and E’s: A-Asymmetrical, B-Border, C-Color, D-Diameter and E-Evolving. These describe how to evaluate a mole."

4. "Slip, slap and slop. Slip on a long-sleeved shirt or pants. Slap on a cap or hat plus sunglasses. Slop on sunscreen. Use a shot-glass-sized portion of lotion with a sun protection factor of 30 or higher. Buy products that offer UVA and UVB protection, which should include ingredients such as zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, avobenzone and oxybenzone." 5. "Use self-tanning creams and lotions to get that sun-kissed glow. Don’t risk your life for the prom. Wrinkles, sun spots and leathery skin are not a happy souvenir of lying out or tanning beds, especially when you can get the same tanning effect from a bottle." Children’s Skin Cancer Often Undiagnosed The Skin Cancer Foundation reports that cancers in children often go undiagnosed because doctors don’t think to look for skin cancer in youngsters. Unlike adults, there are currently no set guidelines for skin examinations in children.

About Loyola University Health System

Loyola University Health System (LUHS) is part of Trinity Health. Based in the western suburbs of Chicago, LUHS is a quaternary care system with a 61-acre main medical center campus, the 36-acre Gottlieb Memorial Hospital campus and more than 30 primary and specialty care facilities in Cook, Will and DuPage counties. Loyola University Medical Center’s campus is conveniently located in Maywood, 13 miles west of Chicago’s Loop and 8 miles east of Oak Brook, Ill. At the heart of the medical center campus is a 559-licensed-bed hospital that houses a Level 1 Trauma Center, a Burn Center and the Ronald McDonald® Children's Hospital of Loyola University Medical Center. Also on campus are the Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, Loyola Outpatient Center, Center for Heart & Vascular Medicine and Loyola Oral Health Center as well as Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing and the Loyola Center for Fitness. Loyola's Gottlieb campus in Melrose Park includes the 255-licensed-bed community hospital, the Professional Office Building housing 150 private practice clinics, the Adult Day Care, the Gottlieb Center for Fitness, Loyola Center for Metabolic Surgery and Bariatric Care and the Loyola Cancer Care & Research at the Marjorie G. Weinberg Cancer Center at Melrose Park.

Trinity Health is a national Catholic health system with an enduring legacy and a steadfast mission to be a transforming and healing presence within the communities we serve. Trinity is committed to being a people-centered health care system that enables better health, better care and lower costs. Trinity Health has 88 hospitals and hundreds of continuing care facilities, home care agencies and outpatient centers in 21 states and 119,000 employees.