7 Tips to Protect Your Child from Burns | News | Loyola Medicine
Friday, February 8, 2019

Seven Tips to Protect Your Child from Burns

 
MAYWOOD, IL – Burns are among the leading causes of deaths and injuries in the United States, and children are especially vulnerable.
 
Each day on average, two children die from burns and more than 300 are treated in emergency rooms. Because young children's cognitive and motor abilities are not fully developed, they are more prone to accidental burns. And because they have thinner skin layers than adults, they can get deeper burn injuries at lower temperatures or shorter exposure times.
 
In recognition of National Burn Awareness Week, Feb. 3 – 9, Loyola Medicine's acclaimed Burn Center is offering parents and caregivers advice on how to prevent burns in children.
 
"Thirty percent of our burn patients are children," said Loyola Burn Center medical director Anthony Baldea, MD. "Most of these burns could have been prevented. While advances in treatments have led to better outcomes, the best strategy is to take simple precautions to prevent burns from occurring in the first place."
 
In conjunction with the American Burn Association, which is sponsoring Burn Awareness Week, Loyola's Burn Center is offering parents these safety tips:
  • Never carry hot liquids while holding a child, and make sure your coffee cups and tea mugs have lids.
  • If you have to leave the bathroom while bathing a child, take the child with you.
  • Never place hot liquids on low coffee tables or end tables that a young child can reach. Don't use table cloths or placemats that a child can pull down.
  • Don't give a child responsibility for doing a task that is above the child's developmental ability. Such tasks include bathing, caring for a younger sibling, cooking, using a microwave, etc.
  • Set water heaters at a maximum of 120 degrees or just below the medium setting. A safe bathing temperature is 100 degrees. Test the temperature at the faucet with a meat thermometer after allowing hot water to run for 1 to 3 minutes.
  • Don't leave the stove unattended while cooking. Turn handles of pots and pans toward the rear of the stove and use back burners when possible.
  • Keep clothes irons, curling irons, etc. unplugged and out of reach.
Loyola Medicine operates one of the largest burn centers in the Midwest. Its multidisciplinary approach and outstanding outcomes are recognized by the American College of Surgeons and American Burn Association.
 

About Loyola Medicine

Loyola Medicine is a quaternary care system based in the western suburbs of Chicago that includes Loyola University Medical Center (LUMC) in Maywood, Gottlieb Memorial Hospital (GMH) in Melrose Park, MacNeal Hospital in Berwyn and convenient locations offering primary and specialty care services from more than 1,750 physicians throughout Cook, Will and DuPage counties. LUMC is a 547-licensed-bed hospital that includes the William G. and Mary A. Ryan Center for Heart & Vascular Medicine, the Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, a Level 1 trauma center, Illinois's largest burn center, a certified comprehensive stroke center and a children’s hospital. The medical center campus is also home to Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing and the Loyola Center for Fitness. GMH is a 247-licensed-bed community hospital with 150 physician offices, an adult day care program, the Gottlieb Center for Fitness, the Loyola Center for Metabolic Surgery and Bariatric Care and the Loyola Cancer Care & Research at the Marjorie G. Weinberg Cancer Center at Melrose Park. MacNeal Hospital is a 374-bed teaching hospital with advanced inpatient and outpatient medical, surgical and psychiatric services, advanced diagnostics and treatments in a convenient community setting at eight locations. Loyola Medicine is a member of Trinity Health, one of the nation’s largest health systems with 94 hospitals in 22 states.

About Trinity Health

Trinity Health is one of the largest multi-institutional Catholic health care delivery systems in the nation, serving diverse communities that include more than 30 million people across 22 states. Trinity Health includes 93 hospitals, as well as 122 continuing care programs that include PACE, senior living facilities, and home care and hospice services. Its continuing care programs provide nearly 2.5 million visits annually. Based in Livonia, Mich., and with annual operating revenues of $17.6 billion and assets of $23.4 billion, the organization returns $1.1 billion to its communities annually in the form of charity care and other community benefit programs. Trinity Health employs about 131,000 colleagues, including 7,500 employed physicians and clinicians. Committed to those who are poor and underserved in its communities, Trinity Health is known for its focus on the country's aging population. As a single, unified ministry, the organization is the innovator of Senior Emergency Departments, the largest not-for-profit provider of home health care services — ranked by number of visits — in the nation, as well as the nation’s leading provider of PACE (Program of All Inclusive Care for the Elderly) based on the number of available programs. For more information, visit www.trinity-health.org. You can also follow @TrinityHealthMI on Twitter.