How to Prevent and Care for Burn Injuries | News | Loyola Medicine
Friday, February 9, 2018

Safety Tips from Loyola Medicine Burn Center

 
MAYWOOD, IL – Burn injuries are the leading cause of unintentional death and injury in the United States.
 
In recognition of National Burn Awareness Week (February 4 – 10), Loyola Medicine and Anthony Baldea, MD, director of Loyola's Burn Center, are offering tips to prevent and care for burn injuries. 
 
Loyola operates the largest burn center in Illinois and is a regional leader in burn care. Loyola's outstanding success rates and multidisciplinary approach are recognized by the American College of Surgeons and American Burn Association.

"Loyola Medicine takes care of some of the most difficult burn cases in the area," Dr. Baldea said. "During Burn Awareness Week, we take special pride in the care we are able to deliver our patients."

Burn Prevention
Reduce water temperature: Set the thermostat on your water heater to below 120 F (48.9 C).

Address outlets and electrical cords: Cover unused electrical outlets with safety caps. Replace damaged electrical cords.

Kitchen safety: Wear short, close-fitting or tightly rolled sleeves when cooking. Turn pot handles away from the stove’s edge and never use wet oven mitts or potholders. Hot cookware can heat moisture in a potholder or hot pad, resulting in a scald burn.

General fire safety: Never leave candles or open flames unattended. Put smoke alarms throughout the house and check the batteries. 

  
Burn Care
If a burn injury does happen:

1) Cool the burn with cool (not cold) water to stop the burning process
2) Remove all clothing and/or diaper from the injured area
3) Cover the area with a clean dry sheet or bandages
4) Seek medical attention
 

When to Seek Medical Attention
Treatment of burns depends on the location and severity of the injury. While some can be treated at home, people with severe burns often require treatment at specialized burn centers. You should seek medical attention when:
  • Burns are covering hands, feet, face, groin, buttocks, major joints or a large area of the body
  • Burns are deep
  • Burns are caused by chemicals or electricity
  • Burns affect the airway, making it difficult to breathe
  • Large blisters appear
  • Signs of infection begin, such as oozing from the wound, increased pain, redness and swelling
  • A burn or blister doesn't heal in several weeks
 

About Loyola Medicine

Loyola Medicine is a quaternary care system based in the western suburbs of Chicago that includes Loyola University Medical Center (LUMC) in Maywood, Gottlieb Memorial Hospital (GMH) in Melrose Park, MacNeal Hospital in Berwyn and convenient locations offering primary and specialty care services from more than 1,772 physicians throughout Cook, Will and DuPage counties. LUMC is a 547-licensed-bed hospital that includes the William G. and Mary A. Ryan Center for Heart & Vascular Medicine, the Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, a Level 1 trauma center, Illinois's largest burn center, a certified comprehensive stroke center and a children’s hospital. The medical center campus is also home to Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing and the Loyola Center for Fitness. GMH is a 247-licensed-bed community hospital with 150 physician offices, an adult day care program, the Gottlieb Center for Fitness, the Loyola Center for Metabolic Surgery and Bariatric Care and the Loyola Cancer Care & Research at the Marjorie G. Weinberg Cancer Center at Melrose Park. MacNeal Hospital is a 374-bed teaching hospital with advanced inpatient and outpatient medical, surgical and psychiatric services, advanced diagnostics and treatments in a convenient community setting. Loyola Medicine is a member of Trinity Health, one of the nation’s largest health systems with 94 hospitals in 22 states.

About Trinity Health

Trinity Health is one of the largest multi-institutional Catholic health care delivery systems in the nation, serving diverse communities that include more than 30 million people across 22 states. Trinity Health includes 93 hospitals, as well as 122 continuing care programs that include PACE, senior living facilities, and home care and hospice services. Its continuing care programs provide nearly 2.5 million visits annually. Based in Livonia, Mich., and with annual operating revenues of $17.6 billion and assets of $23.4 billion, the organization returns $1.1 billion to its communities annually in the form of charity care and other community benefit programs. Trinity Health employs about 131,000 colleagues, including 7,500 employed physicians and clinicians. Committed to those who are poor and underserved in its communities, Trinity Health is known for its focus on the country's aging population. As a single, unified ministry, the organization is the innovator of Senior Emergency Departments, the largest not-for-profit provider of home health care services — ranked by number of visits — in the nation, as well as the nation’s leading provider of PACE (Program of All Inclusive Care for the Elderly) based on the number of available programs. For more information, visit www.trinity-health.org. You can also follow @TrinityHealthMI on Twitter.