Neurosurgeon Suguna Pappu, MD, PhD, Joins Loyola Medicine
Thursday, July 12, 2018

Neurosurgeon Suguna Pappu, MD, PhD, Joins Loyola Medicine

MAYWOOD, IL – Suguna Pappu, MD, PhD, a neurosurgeon whose clinical expertise includes neck and back problems, hydrocephalus and trauma, has joined Loyola Medicine.
 
Many back and neck problems are caused by chronic degenerative arthritis. The spinal cord becomes compressed, making it difficult for a patient to walk or hold a cup of coffee.

"Surgery to relieve that pressure can improve a patient's quality of life substantially," Dr. Pappu said.
 
Hydrocephalus is excess cerebrospinal fluid in brain cavities. It can cause memory loss, poor coordination or balance, loss of bladder control and other symptoms. Hydrocephalus typically is treated by placing a shunt (tube) that drains the excess fluid from the brain to another part of the body.
 
Dr. Pappu comes from a family of educators and she takes pride in communicating with her patients. She shows pictures, explains medical terms and refers patients to reliable websites.
 
Dr. Pappu sees patients at the Loyola Outpatient Center in Maywood and at Edward Hines, Jr. VA Hospital, where she also has a clinical appointment.
 
Dr. Pappu also conducts research. Two main areas involve quantitative methods to evaluate hydrocephalus and a promising new field of big data research called radiomics. Radiomics researchers extract features from digital medical images and then mine large data sets for insights that could help guide diagnosis and treatment.
 
Dr. Pappu is an associate professor in the department of neurological surgery of Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. She comes to Loyola from the University of New Mexico, where she was an assistant professor in the department of neurological surgery.
 
Dr. Pappu earned a medical degree from Yale School of Medicine. She completed an internship in general surgery at Yale New Haven Hospital and a residency in neurological surgery at the University of New Mexico. She earned a PhD in operations research from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Pappu is board certified in neurological surgery.

About Loyola Medicine and Trinity Health

Loyola Medicine, a member of Trinity Health, is a quaternary care system based in the western suburbs of Chicago that includes Loyola University Medical Center (LUMC), Gottlieb Memorial Hospital, MacNeal Hospital and convenient locations offering primary and specialty care services from 1,877 physicians throughout Cook, Will and DuPage counties. LUMC is a 547-licensed-bed hospital in Maywood that includes the William G. and Mary A. Ryan Center for Heart & Vascular Medicine, the Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, a Level 1 trauma center, Illinois's largest burn center, a certified comprehensive stroke center and a children’s hospital. Having delivered compassionate care for over 50 years, Loyola also trains the next generation of caregivers through its teaching affiliation with Loyola University Chicago’s Stritch School of Medicine and Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing. Gottlieb is a 247-licensed-bed community hospital in Melrose Park with 150 physician offices, an adult day care program, the Gottlieb Center for Fitness, the Loyola Center for Metabolic Surgery and Bariatric Care and the Loyola Cancer Care & Research at the Marjorie G. Weinberg Cancer Center at Melrose Park. MacNeal Hospital is a 374-bed teaching hospital in Berwyn with advanced inpatient and outpatient medical, surgical and psychiatric services, advanced diagnostics and treatments. MacNeal has a 12-bed acute rehabilitation unit, a 25-bed inpatient skilled nursing facility, and a 68-bed behavioral health program and community clinics. MacNeal has provided quality, patient-centered care to the near west suburbs since 1919.

Trinity Health is one of the largest multi-institutional Catholic healthcare systems in the nation, serving diverse communities that include more than 30 million people across 22 states. Trinity Health includes 94 hospitals, as well as 109 continuing care locations that include PACE programs, senior living facilities and home care and hospice services. Its continuing care programs provide nearly 2.5 million visits annually. Based in Livonia, Mich., and with annual operating revenues of $18.3 billion and assets of $26.2 billion, the organization returns $1.1 billion to its communities annually in the form of charity care and other community benefit programs. Trinity employs about 133,000 colleagues, including 7,800 employed physicians and clinicians. Committed to those who are poor and underserved in its communities, Trinity is known for its focus on the country's aging population. As a single, unified ministry, the organization is the innovator of Senior Emergency Departments, the largest not-for-profit provider of home health care services—ranked by number of visits—in the nation, as well as the nation’s leading provider of PACE (Program of All Inclusive Care for the Elderly) based on the number of available programs.