What is the Mortality Rate for Children Hospitalized for Stroke?
Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Neurologist José Biller, MD, is Co-author of Major Pediatric Stroke Study

 
MAYWOOD, IL –  A major international study has found that 2.6 percent of infants and children hospitalized for stroke die in the hospital.
 
Loyola Medicine neurologist José Biller, MD, a nationally known expert on strokes in children, is among the co-authors of the study, published in the journal Pediatrics. First author is Lauren A. Beslow, MD, of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
 
The retrospective study included 915 infants younger than one month and 2,273 children aged one month to 18 years who were stroke patients at 87 hospitals in 24 countries. The type of stroke examined in the study, called ischemic, is caused by blood clots and is the most common type.
 
The study found that during their hospitalizations for ischemic stroke, 1.5 percent of the infants and 3.1 percent of the children died, with an overall mortality rate of 2.6 percent.
 
Researchers classified the causes of death as stroke alone, a combination of an underlying disease and stroke or simply an underlying disease. Nearly two-thirds (65 percent) of hospital deaths with a known cause were related to the stroke and/or subsequent deficits.
 
Risk factors for dying in the hospital included congenital heart disease and having a severe type of ischemic stroke known as "posterior plus anterior circulation."
 
Hispanic ethnicity also was associated with higher mortality, but black infants and children were not at higher risk of dying. The reason for the higher Hispanic mortality rate is not known. Future studies "should explore whether ethnic differences in mortality rates are related to disparities in care," researchers wrote.
 
Also at higher risk of dying were infants and children who did not have seizures. The reason may be that infants who present with seizures might be diagnosed and treated more quickly for their strokes, researchers wrote.
 
Childhood ischemic strokes affect 1.2 to 2.4 per 100,000 children per year in developed countries. Although deaths from ischemic and other types of stroke appear to have declined, stroke remains among the top 10 causes of death among children in the United States.
 
Researchers wrote that improved stroke recognition, earlier supportive care, more rapid intervention and neuroprotective treatments "are critical for decreasing mortality after stroke in the pediatric population."
 
The study is titled, "Mortality After Pediatric Arterial Ischemic Stroke."
 

About Loyola Medicine and Trinity Health

Loyola Medicine, a member of Trinity Health, is a quaternary care system based in the western suburbs of Chicago that includes Loyola University Medical Center (LUMC), Gottlieb Memorial Hospital, MacNeal Hospital and convenient locations offering primary and specialty care services from 1,877 physicians throughout Cook, Will and DuPage counties. LUMC is a 547-licensed-bed hospital in Maywood that includes the William G. and Mary A. Ryan Center for Heart & Vascular Medicine, the Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, a Level 1 trauma center, Illinois's largest burn center, a certified comprehensive stroke center and a children’s hospital. Having delivered compassionate care for over 50 years, Loyola also trains the next generation of caregivers through its teaching affiliation with Loyola University Chicago’s Stritch School of Medicine and Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing. Gottlieb is a 247-licensed-bed community hospital in Melrose Park with 150 physician offices, an adult day care program, the Gottlieb Center for Fitness, the Loyola Center for Metabolic Surgery and Bariatric Care and the Loyola Cancer Care & Research at the Marjorie G. Weinberg Cancer Center at Melrose Park. MacNeal Hospital is a 374-bed teaching hospital in Berwyn with advanced inpatient and outpatient medical, surgical and psychiatric services, advanced diagnostics and treatments. MacNeal has a 12-bed acute rehabilitation unit, a 25-bed inpatient skilled nursing facility, and a 68-bed behavioral health program and community clinics. MacNeal has provided quality, patient-centered care to the near west suburbs since 1919.

Trinity Health is one of the largest multi-institutional Catholic healthcare systems in the nation, serving diverse communities that include more than 30 million people across 22 states. Trinity Health includes 94 hospitals, as well as 109 continuing care locations that include PACE programs, senior living facilities and home care and hospice services. Its continuing care programs provide nearly 2.5 million visits annually. Based in Livonia, Mich., and with annual operating revenues of $18.3 billion and assets of $26.2 billion, the organization returns $1.1 billion to its communities annually in the form of charity care and other community benefit programs. Trinity employs about 133,000 colleagues, including 7,800 employed physicians and clinicians. Committed to those who are poor and underserved in its communities, Trinity is known for its focus on the country's aging population. As a single, unified ministry, the organization is the innovator of Senior Emergency Departments, the largest not-for-profit provider of home health care services—ranked by number of visits—in the nation, as well as the nation’s leading provider of PACE (Program of All Inclusive Care for the Elderly) based on the number of available programs.