Friday, April 13, 2012

Loyola Stritch, Niehoff Students Receive Prestigious Schweitzer Fellowships

Students plan to challenge health-care inequities

MAYWOOD, Ill. -- Students from Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine and Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing were recently selected for prestigious Schweitzer Fellowships. Michelle Leahy, Ray Mendez and Melody Cibock were awarded the fellowships to design and implement innovative, yearlong projects to help vulnerable Chicago communities improve their health and well-being.

Named in honor of famed humanitarian and Nobel laureate Albert Schweitzer, MD, the Chicago Area Schweitzer Fellows Program encourages service-minded students to “make their lives their argument,” by addressing the serious health challenges facing underserved populations. Stritch and Niehoff have a rich history of collaborating with the Schweitzer Fellows Program to bring better health care to surrounding communities.

In collaboration with existing community organizations, schools or clinics, each Schweitzer fellow provides 200 hours of direct service. Stritch student Michelle Leahy plans to introduce a diabetes prevention program in the Humboldt Park neighborhood that will focus on empowering families with tools for behavior change and healthy living.

“Being able to make healthy choices for oneself is not a privilege, it is a right that everyone should enjoy,” Leahy said. “Our job, as Schweitzer fellows and advocates of social justice, is to make this ideology a reality.”"

Stritch student Ray Mendez will expand the university’s current educational efforts to encourage underrepresented youth to pursue health careers. Latinos and African-Americans currently make up 28 percent of the U.S. population, but only 9 percent of physicians and 7 percent of registered nurses.

“Studies have shown data linking the lack of health-care professionals from underrepresented backgrounds to the presence of health-care disparities in those same populations,” Mendez said.

Niehoff student Melody Cibock plans to empower people with and without developmental disabilities in the L’Arche International community to take a more active role in their health-care decisions and general well-being.

“Everyone deserves the same opportunities for health and well-being,” Cibock said.  Once established, she hopes to make her project sustainable beyond the fellowship year. “I anticipate that there might be challenges, so I know it will take dedication, hard work and love."

In addition to the community service projects, other aspects of the Schweitzer Fellows Program will help strengthen the students’ skills and provide them with ongoing opportunities for discussion and collaboration with colleagues from a wide variety of allied health professions. “I chose to apply for the Schweitzer Fellowship because I knew that working in a passionate, multidisciplinary team would improve my project's effectiveness,” Mendez said.

Competition for the coveted service-learning program was especially intense this year: a record number of 142 students applied and 31 fellows were selected. Since the program began in 1996, 435 fellows have contributed more than 87,000 hours of service expanding the capacities of 170 Chicago community organizations.

“Our Schweitzer fellows’ sense of altruism and dedication to service is not only remarkable, but it is clearly sustainable,” said Quentin Young, MD, the program’s founder and chairman. “The long-term vision for the Schweitzer Fellows Program is to cultivate lifelong leaders in service, and we are aware that a decisive majority of Schweitzer alumni remain engaged with helping poorly resourced communities well beyond their fellowship year."

The Chicago Area Schweitzer Fellows Program is a partnership between The Albert Schweitzer Fellowship™, headquartered in Boston, and the Health & Medicine Policy Research Group, a Chicago nonprofit that focuses on health-care access for the working poor and uninsured. More information can be found on the Schweitzer website, and the Health & Medicine website,

About Loyola University Health System

Loyola University Health System (LUHS) is part of Trinity Health. Based in the western suburbs of Chicago, LUHS is a quaternary care system with a 61-acre main medical center campus, the 36-acre Gottlieb Memorial Hospital campus and more than 30 primary and specialty care facilities in Cook, Will and DuPage counties. Loyola University Medical Center’s campus is conveniently located in Maywood, 13 miles west of Chicago’s Loop and 8 miles east of Oak Brook, Ill. At the heart of the medical center campus is a 559-licensed-bed hospital that houses a Level 1 Trauma Center, a Burn Center and the Ronald McDonald® Children's Hospital of Loyola University Medical Center. Also on campus are the Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, Loyola Outpatient Center, Center for Heart & Vascular Medicine and Loyola Oral Health Center as well as Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing and the Loyola Center for Fitness. Loyola's Gottlieb campus in Melrose Park includes the 255-licensed-bed community hospital, the Professional Office Building housing 150 private practice clinics, the Adult Day Care, the Gottlieb Center for Fitness, Loyola Center for Metabolic Surgery and Bariatric Care and the Loyola Cancer Care & Research at the Marjorie G. Weinberg Cancer Center at Melrose Park.

Trinity Health is a national Catholic health system with an enduring legacy and a steadfast mission to be a transforming and healing presence within the communities we serve. Trinity is committed to being a people-centered health care system that enables better health, better care and lower costs. Trinity Health has 88 hospitals and hundreds of continuing care facilities, home care agencies and outpatient centers in 21 states and 119,000 employees.