Thursday, April 10, 2014

Juicing Trend Is Pulp Fiction for Many, Says Loyola Dietitian

MELROSE PARK,Ill. - Fueled by a $5 billion dollar industry that continues to grow 5 to 8 percent annually, juicing is being promoted by many as a useful strategy for weight loss. But the trend of extracting the liquid from produce is not widely recommended within the medical and surgical weight-loss community.

“Juicing in general reduces the fiber content and therefore decreases the feeling of fullness gained by eating fresh, crisp fruits and vegetables,” said Ashley Barrient, MEd, LPC, RD, LDN, dietitian, Loyola Center for Metabolic Surgery and Bariatric Care.”Patients who consume whole fruit and vegetables report greater fullness and overall satisfaction with their diet.” Barrient specializes in working with weight-loss patients.

For those who have undergone surgical weight loss, juicing can pose many risks. “The concentrated sugar and caloric content of juice can result in “Dumping Syndrome,” which includes diarrhea, rapid pulse, cold sweats, nausea and uncomfortable abdominal fullness,” Barrient said.

The sugar and calorie content of juice is much greater than the sugar content of whole fruit and vegetables, and it takes several pieces of produce to make an average-size juice portion. “Most of the patients in the Loyola program incorporate whole fruit back into their diet one to two months following surgery,” she said. “Appropriately portioned fruit, meaning half of a banana or a half-cup of berries, is digested well by surgical weight-loss patients."

The concentrated sugar and caloric content of juicing also discourages weight loss after surgery and increases the risk for regaining weight in the future.

“Aim for a diet rich in lean protein and dairy, fruits and vegetables and ensure adequate water intake,” Barrient said. She also emphasizes that supplementing diet with required vitamins and minerals is a lifetime requirement following weight-loss surgery.

“The most successful diets are those that can be sustained,” Barrient said. “For most people, juicing is a trend and trends do not last."

For more information about the Loyola Center for Metabolic Surgery & Bariatric Care, contact 1-800-355-0416 or visit loyolamedicine.org.

About Loyola University Health System

Loyola University Health System (LUHS) is a member of Trinity Health. Based in the western suburbs of Chicago, LUHS is a quaternary care system that includes Loyola University Medical Center (LUMC), located on a 61-acre campus in Maywood, Gottlieb Memorial Hospital (GMH), on a 36-acre campus in Melrose Park, and convenient locations offering primary and specialty care services throughout Cook, Will and DuPage counties. At the heart of LUMC is a 547-licensed-bed hospital that houses the Center for Heart & Vascular Medicine, the Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, a Level 1 trauma center, a burn center, a children's hospital, Loyola Outpatient Center, and Loyola Oral Health Center. The campus also is home to Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing and the Loyola Center for Fitness. The GMH campus includes a 254-licensed-bed community hospital, a Professional Office Building with 150 private practice clinics, an adult day care program, the Gottlieb Center for Fitness, the Loyola Center for Metabolic Surgery and Bariatric Care and the Loyola Cancer Care & Research at the Marjorie G. Weinberg Cancer Center at Melrose Park.

Trinity Health is one of the largest multi-institutional Catholic health care delivery systems in the nation. It serves people and communities in 22 states from coast to coast with 93 hospitals, and 120 continuing care locations — including home care, hospice, PACE and senior living facilities — that provide nearly 2.5 million visits annually.