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Loyola Initiates Comprehensive LDL Apheresis Program

MAYWOOD, Ill. - Some patients are genetically prone to such dangerously high levels of cholesterol that no amount of diet, exercise and medications can reduce their cholesterol to safe levels.

So Loyola University Medical Center is offering a treatment called LDL apheresis, which is similar to kidney dialysis. Once every two weeks, a patient spends two to four hours connected to an apheresis unit that removes 70-80 percent of the patient’s LDL (bad) cholesterol, then returns the blood to the body. The good HDL cholesterol is not removed.

Loyola is among a handful of centers in the Midwest – and the only academic medical center in Chicago – to offer LDL apheresis.

Loyola’s multidisciplinary LDL Apheresis Program is intended for patients who have been unable to control cholesterol with lifestyle changes and medications. They include patients with coronary heart disease who have LDL cholesterol greater than 200 mg/dL, and patients without coronary artery disease who have LDL levels greater than 300 mg/dL.

About 1 in 500 people have genetic abnormalities that cause LDL cholesterol levels to be three to five times as high as normal levels. The condition, called familial hypercholesterolemia, causes heart disease at a young age.

Familial hypercholesterolemia runs in Fran Tobias’ family. Her father died of a heart attack in his early 40s, her mother had a heart attack at age 45, and two brothers died of heart disease. Tobias had her first heart attack at age 37, a second heart attack at age 45, a quintuple bypass surgery and eight stents.
Tobias, 56, who lives in Glen Ellyn, is successfully controlling her LDL by coming in for apheresis treatments at Loyola every two weeks.

“This is literally a lifesaver for me,” Tobias said. “If I were to stop, I probably would have another heart attack within 18 months to two years."

LDL apheresis is done under the guidance of medical specialists from Loyola’s transfusion service, and patients have periodic clinical follow-ups with a lipidologist (cholesterol specialist). The program is directed by Binh An P. Phan, MD, and Phillip J. DeChristopher, MD, PhD. Phan is director of Loyola’s Preventive Cardiology Program and DeChristopher is medical director of Transfusion Medicine and the Apheresis Center.

“The aim of the Loyola LDL Apheresis Program is to provide a multidisciplinary, specialized service for the comprehensive evaluation and treatment of patients who require LDL apheresis,” Phan said.

If you are a prospective patient and would like more information or to make an appointment, please call 888-LUHS-888 (888-584-7888).

Loyola University Health System (LUHS) is a member of Trinity Health. Based in the western suburbs of Chicago, LUHS is a quaternary care system with a 61-acre main medical center campus, the 36-acre Gottlieb Memorial Hospital campus and more than 30 primary and specialty care facilities in Cook, Will and DuPage counties. The medical center campus is conveniently located in Maywood, 13 miles west of the Chicago Loop and 8 miles east of Oak Brook, Ill. The heart of the medical center campus is a 559-licensed-bed hospital that houses a Level 1 Trauma Center, a Burn Center and the Ronald McDonald® Children's Hospital of Loyola University Medical Center. Also on campus are the Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, Loyola Outpatient Center, Center for Heart & Vascular Medicine and Loyola Oral Health Center as well as the LUC Stritch School of Medicine, the LUC Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing and the Loyola Center for Fitness. Loyola's Gottlieb campus in Melrose Park includes the 255-licensed-bed community hospital, the Professional Office Building housing 150 private practice clinics, the Adult Day Care, the Gottlieb Center for Fitness, Loyola Center for Metabolic Surgery and Bariatric Care and the Loyola Cancer Care & Research at the Marjorie G. Weinberg Cancer Center at Melrose Park.

Media Relations

Jim Ritter
Media Relations
(708) 216-2445
jritter@lumc.edu
Anne Dillon
Media Relations
(708) 216-8232
adillon@lumc.edu