Spring is an Ideal Time to Take Care of Varicose Veins

News Archive March 21, 2011

Spring is an Ideal Time to Take Care of Varicose Veins

Loyola physicians use noninvasive treatment to get legs ready for summer
MAYWOOD, Ill. -- Like many women, Karen Special, 57, developed varicose veins during her first pregnancy. These unsightly veins became permanent while she was pregnant with her third child. As an avid golfer, Special frequently wore skirts while she played. However, she became increasingly self-conscious about her legs as the veins became more apparent and ropelike over time. Special’s varicose veins also grew to be more painful. She developed discomfort above her right knee and in her groin, which made exercising, gardening and housecleaning a challenge. “Every year my varicose veins got a little worse, and I decided I couldn’t take the pain anymore,” Special said. “I decided 20 years after the birth of my last child to finally do something about my condition.” Special turned to physicians at Loyola University Health System for help during golf’s off-season. She underwent a laser procedure and returned home the same day without any need for pain medication. The appearance of her legs improved dramatically within one month. “I am very active, so I was pleased with how quickly I was able to get back to my life,” Special said. “I also am pleased with the appearance of my legs, and I look forward to getting back onto the golf course without embarrassment and pain.” Loyola vascular surgeon Ross Milner, MD, FACS, reports spring is a good time to take care of varicose veins. Loyola physicians most commonly use a laser to treat varicose veins. Patients begin this process with a consultation and an ultrasound to examine the legs. They also wear compression stockings to ease symptoms and prevent the varicose veins from getting worse. Surgeons then insert a small catheter into the veins and use a laser to destroy them. “People with varicose veins should seek treatment if their veins are red, swollen or tender,” Dr. Milner said. “The spring is an ideal time to do this, because it allows plenty of time to recover before the patient has to wear summer clothes.” Approximately 20 million people have varicose veins. They occur when valves weaken and stop pumping blood properly out of the legs and into the heart. In addition to the cosmetic concerns, they also can lead to leg ulcers if left untreated. Varicose veins can be genetic. Other causes include aging, being overweight or pregnant and regularly standing for a long time. Dr. Milner is part of a group of physicians handling varicose-vein removal. Others include Bernadette Aulivola, MD, RVT, FACS, and Richard Hershberger, MD, RVT. For more information or to make an appointment with a Loyola vascular surgeon, call (888) LUHS-888.
Loyola University Health System (LUHS) is a member of Trinity Health. Based in the western suburbs of Chicago, LUHS is a quaternary care system with a 61-acre main medical center campus, the 36-acre Gottlieb Memorial Hospital campus and more than 30 primary and specialty care facilities in Cook, Will and DuPage counties. The medical center campus is conveniently located in Maywood, 13 miles west of the Chicago Loop and 8 miles east of Oak Brook, Ill. The heart of the medical center campus is a 559-licensed-bed hospital that houses a Level 1 Trauma Center, a Burn Center and the Ronald McDonald® Children's Hospital of Loyola University Medical Center. Also on campus are the Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, Loyola Outpatient Center, Center for Heart & Vascular Medicine and Loyola Oral Health Center as well as the LUC Stritch School of Medicine, the LUC Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing and the Loyola Center for Fitness. Loyola's Gottlieb campus in Melrose Park includes the 255-licensed-bed community hospital, the Professional Office Building housing 150 private practice clinics, the Adult Day Care, the Gottlieb Center for Fitness, Loyola Center for Metabolic Surgery and Bariatric Care and the Loyola Cancer Care & Research at the Marjorie G. Weinberg Cancer Center at Melrose Park.
© 2011 Loyola University Chicago Health Sciences Division. All rights reserved.  &npsp; Privacy Policy   Privacy Policy